Amazing Kids! Magazine

Schools Around the World

By Sharon Lin

 

If there’s anything that ties all of us together, it’s school. What else takes up about eight hours of our day, occupies our studies, and brings hope of a better future? Ever since the first schools had been set up in ancient times, education has become a standard of almost every civilization. Today, we can find institutions on all seven continents – yes there are even schoolchildren on Antarctica! However, as much as education is a virtue to us today, what exactly constitutes as an education? Let’s take a look at our fellow students as they engage in learning, in their own special ways!

DISCLAIMER: Photo graphs by Julian Germain originally appearing in The Guardian

http://www.theguardian.com/education/gallery/2012/sep/14/schools-around-the-world-children#/?picture=395983374&index=0

Brazil

School Escola Estadual Nossa Senhora do Belo Ramo, Belo Horizonte, Brazil

Escola Estadual Nossa Senhora do Belo Ramo, Belo Horizonte, Brazil

These schoolchildren come from the middle to lower classes of Brazil. Their parents are unable to afford a private education, so they send their children to the local public school. Unfortunately, few children from this socioeconomic class are able to attend school.

Germany

School Agnes-Miegl-Realschule, D¸sseldorf, Germany

Agnes-Miegl-Realschule, Düsseldorf, Germany

The children in this photo come from more fortunate backgrounds. They attend a typical public school, and are allowed to exhibit their own fashion. This classroom is diverse, with colorful walls and desks.

Yemen

School Al Ishraq Primary, Akamat Al Meígab, Yemen

Al Ishraq Primary, Akamat Al Me’gab, Yemen

This one room schoolhouse is the only educational building in this small, mountainous community in Yemen. The children come from families whose ancestors have resided in the largely agricultural regions of the mountainside. The older children help to teach the younger ones.

United States

School Beaumont High School, St Louis, Missouri

Beaumont High School, St Louis, Missouri

This school isn’t the best candidate to exhibit the wide variety of cultures in American schools, but it nonetheless does show the quality of education that the majority of American children are fortunate to have. The children here are enthusiastically listening to their teacher as he gives them a math lesson. The classroom is well furnished.

Netherlands

School Bornago College, Netherlands

Bornago College, Netherlands

These students are currently in their PE class. They are a very friendly year nine class (13-14 year-olds) and readily posed for the camera.

Spain

Colegio de Educación Público, Estados Unidos de América Huarte de San Juan, Madrid, Spain

Colegio de Educación Público, Estados Unidos de América Huarte de San Juan, Madrid, Spain

These children were being taught the Suzuki method along with the Madrid Philharmonic orchestra in their music education class. The class is relatively small, and the children are relatively young.

Peru

Escolar Secundaria Tiracanchi, Peru

Escolar Secundaria Tiracanchi, Peru

These children come from a small village where their sole language is Quechua. None of the local teachers were, unfortunately, qualified to teach. Only half of the children had electricity at home, and many helped their parents with farming.

Ethiopia

Gambella Elementary School, Gambella, Ethiopia

Gambella Elementary School, Gambella, Ethiopia

In this school, the classes are very large and the facilities very limited. On the bright side, teachers are admired and learning is not taken for granted. The children are learning handwriting and mathematics, along with other elementary subjects.

Taiwan

Min-sheng Junior High School, Taipei, Taiwan

Min-sheng Junior High School, Taipei, Taiwan

Here, the children are taking a quick half hour nap right before their break. The students spend all day together, eating lunch together (even with the teacher!), switching classes together, and socializing. Their “nap time” is set aside as a class, and has been so ingrained in them that the majority really do fall asleep.

For more information on schools from around the world, check out Julian Germain’s full collection, Classroom Portraits!

One comment

  1. Wow!!!