Amazing Kids! Magazine

The Mesmerizing View

By Aryaman Sheth, Photography Editor

 

My bedroom, a bright, vibrant room arranged with travel poster, footballer’s bobble-heads, snow globes, and other trinkets. However, the view from my window was a sight worthy of glancing at for hours at an end.

My abode, on the 17th floor of a 20-floor edifice, in Cuffe Parade. My window, overlooking the vast Arabian Sea and numerous fishermen’s huts. Early in the morning when the sun wakes up, it lights up the sky with an orange tint. At that time when the city and streets are so quiet, nothing, not even my mother’s yelling to get dressed, draws my attention away from the captivating view.

The reflection of the sun on the water gives me a sign. A sign of hope, hope that even in an unknown dark patch, there will always be a glimmer of brighter things to come. There is an equally majestic sight at sunset; however, the sunrise lightens up, puts a smile on my face, and energizes me for the day. Thus, I feel that when the sun rises, it is the best time to look out from my bedroom window.

Often in the summer, I would sit on the windowsill with my camera, capturing pictures of all the different times of the day. In the night, there is a similar vision, but that feeling of hope only occurs every fortnight.

Being on the 17th floor, I can’t really hear much—there is, however, the faint sound of traffic jam horns. What speaks to me the most is the view, telling me in times of trouble not to worry and that there will always be a way out. Taking in this scene, these quaint and peaceful times daring me to dream, my eyes only too often glimmer with wonder.

I still remember the day my grandfather passed away. The room seemed a bit darker, but the sunrise was just as bright and vibrant. My cousins, their parents, my parents, and I all sat sipping coffee and telling each other not to grieve for too long, to remember all the good times—because happiness can be found even in the darkest of times if one remembers to turn on a light, or open a window to see the outside.